GE 12730 CEILING FAN Z-WAVE SWITCH REVIEW

March 20, 2015

Looking at the new retail smart home series from GE, you can tell the technology giant is taking Z-Wave more and more seriously. Besides updated versions of their best-selling models, they added a whole new switch to their home automation family - the GE 12730 Z-wave In-Wall Smart Fan Control.

It’s the first intelligent ceiling fan switch since Leviton’s overpriced Vizia product. The good news is that you’ll easily buy the GE Z-Wave switch under $50 and it will most likely work with any kind of Z-Wave gateway. Aside from the usual suspects, VeraEdge and SmartThings, the device is supported by Staples Connect, Wink, and ADT Pulse to name just a few.

What do you get for your money?

  • 3-speed ceiling fan control - manual and wireless when connected to your Z-Wave gateway hub.
  • 100 feet range - it will work great with the fan on your porch.
  • 2-year limited warranty when most Z-Wave devices only carry a 12-month warranty.
  • High temperature resistance up to 104 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • 1.5 Amp maximum resistive load - you can use the switch with 2 identical fans as long as they’re up to 1.5 Amp.

What’s missing?

  • You still need to buy wall plates and ivory, dark brown, and black paddles if you need them.
  • If you want light control for your fan, you’ll have to get a separate light switch.
  • Even though it works with outdoor fans, the switch itself needs to be installed indoors.
  • Check your gang box - there is no way of connecting this switch without a neutral wire.
  • You’ll need to buy add-on switches if you’re looking to use the unit in a 3-way or 4-way configuration. Read more in the manual.

Already got the GE Z-Wave fan switch? Post your thoughts and questions below!




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